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Yellofin Tuna

The yellowfin tuna is among the larger tuna species, reaching weights over 180 kg (400 lb).

Yellowfin tuna are torpedo-shaped with dark metallic blue backs, yellow sides, and a silver belly. They have very long anal and dorsal fins and finlets that are bright yellow. Yellowfin can live up to six or seven years. They are highly migratory and are found throughout the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian Oceans. They form schools with other tunas like skipjack and bigeye.

Bigeye Tuna

Bigeye tuna can grow up to 250 centimetres (98 in) in length. Maximum weight of individuals probably exceeds 180 kg (400 lb), with the all-tackle angling record standing at 178 kg (392 lb). They are large, deep-bodied, streamlined fish with large heads and eyes.

Good quality Bigeye meat has a reddish-pinkish flesh color. Caught in deeper, cooler water, it typically has a higher fat content than Yellowfin and is preferred by sashimi lovers. For less discriminating consumers, the two species are interchangeable.

Bigeye Tuna is an excellent source of healthy, extra lean protein. It is also low in saturated fat and low in sodium. It is rich in niacin, vitamin B6, vitamin B12, selenium and phosphorus. Bigeye Tuna is a good source of iodine and magnesium. Also, provides about 500 mg of omega-3’s (DHA and EPA) per 4 ounce serving of fresh fish.

Red Snapper

The northern red snapper, Lutjanus campechanus, is a species of snapper native to the western Atlantic Ocean including the Gulf of Mexico, where it inhabits environments associated with reefs. This species is commercially important and is also sought-after as a game fish.

Red snapper are generally found at depths between 30 and 620 feet along the eastern coast of North, Central, and northern South America and in the Gulf of Mexico.

Red snapper in deeper waters tend to be redder than those caught in shallower waters. They have a long triangular face with the upper part sloping more strongly than the lower. Their jaws are equal, with the lower one sometimes slightly projecting. They have enlarged canine teeth, which is why they’re called “snappers.”

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